Author Archives: Nitin

About Nitin

Nitin Sawhney, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Media Studies at The New School. His research, teaching and creative practice engages the critical role of technology, civic media, and artistic interventions in contested spaces. He examines social movements and crisis contexts, though forms of creative urban tactics, participatory research, performance and documentary film. Nitin previously taught at the MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology (ACT) and conducted research at the MIT Media Lab on networked collaboration for sustainable product design, ubiquitous computing and responsive media in urban spaces. At The New School he has conducted research on participatory data-driven activism through OccupyData Hackathons in New York City and facilitating DIY urbanism for civic action in neighborhoods of Moscow. Nitin established the Engage Media Lab at The New School for students to design and conduct participatory media-based learning and assessment with youth in New York City, and has previously conducted research with Palestinian youth in the West Bank, East Jerusalem and Gaza. Nitin completed the documentary film, Flying Paper, about the participatory culture of kite making and flying among children in Gaza, with support from National Geographic, which has been screened in dozens of international film festivals. He recently initiated and co-curated the Guatemala Después project, examining contemporary artistic practices through collaborative exhibitions held in New York City and Guatemala from April-July 2015. He is currently completing a new documentary film, Zona Intervenida, focusing on historic memory through site-specific performance interventions in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala.

Occupy Video as Data: Visualizing Temporal Narratives

How do we make sense of specific events occurring during the Occupy movement through narratives emerging from social media over time? When an NYPD office pepper sprays peaceful protestors, the event is immediately captured on camera phones with subsequent citizen

Occupy Video as Data: Visualizing Temporal Narratives

How do we make sense of specific events occurring during the Occupy movement through narratives emerging from social media over time? When an NYPD office pepper sprays peaceful protestors, the event is immediately captured on camera phones with subsequent citizen